Recurrent fever in a toddler

 

I was recently asked if it’s normal for a toddler to have fevers up to 102.8.  This answer depends on a few things.  Timing of the fever is important;  it is notable that body temperature can increase at night, due to the body’s natural circadian rhythm.  If the fever is various points of the day, it’s important to assure that environmental temperature is not a source.  Make sure the room temperature is comfortable;  not too hot or too cold.  If the child is wearing a lot of clothing, remove them and recheck temperature.  Notice if there are associated symptoms – like not eating or drinking, sleeping more than normal, cuddling more than normal.  These are typical signs that there is something, whether it be a viral or bacterial infection, going on.  Without other associated symptoms, causes of recurrent fever can be many.  If obvious source like ear or throat infection are ruled out, then it’s possible that blood work, urine tests, and a chest xray may be needed.  In some of those cases, causes of fever are found.  I have had children in my practice where no cause for fever was found – and ultimately were diagnosed by a specialist with a condition known as “Periodic Fever”.  In this condition, there is no long term complications notable.

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About cschaffer78

I'm a family practice physician in Evansville, IN. My practice is described as "full-spectrum" family practice, meaning I see patients "from cradle to grave". I care for men and women of all ages, I deliver babies, and even follow my patients when they are hospitalized. Medical Disclaimer The content of this website is provided for general informational purposes only and is not intended as, nor should it be considered a substitute for, professional medical advice. Do not use the information on this website for diagnosing or treating any medical or health condition. If you have or suspect you have a medical problem, promptly contact your professional healthcare provider
This entry was posted in Infection, Lab tests, Pediatrics. Bookmark the permalink.

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